Category: caesar

tiny-librarian:

The Ides of March are come.

Aye, Caesar, but not gone.

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pelusian:

Bust of Julius Caesar

Marble sculpture of Julius Caesar

(100-44 BC).

Museo di Capodimonte, Naples, Campania, Italy

tiny-librarian:

Detail of “Caesar restoring Cleopatra to the throne of Egypt” by Pierre de Cortone.

stannisbaratheon:

history meme. five assassinations: Julius Caesar, by Senators of Rome
15 MARCH 44BC. On the Ides of March, Julius Caesar entered the Senate. There he was stabbed to death by around forty senators, members of the ruling class and paragons of education and intellect in the society of Ancient Rome. Only twenty-one names of these conspirators, self-styled as “The Liberators”, survive history and nearly all of them staunchly defended the so-called sancitity of the Republic threatened, allegedly, by the quick rise to tyrannical power of Julius Caesar. However, the death of the “tyrant” had also led to the end of the Republic for which he was killed. Civil war broke out, with Mark Antony on one side and Octavian, Caesar’s legal heir, on the other. Eventually, Mark Antony fled to Egypt, where he would be defeated by Octavian. Octavian became Augustus, the first Emperor and founder of the Roman Empire, and ushered in the era of Pax Romana.

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legiocaesaris:

A consul of Rome. To die in this sordid way. Quartered like some low thief. Shame!”

ars-videndi:

Mino da Fiesole
(Poppi, Tuscany 1429 – 1484 Florence),

Julius Caesar,
garland by Mino da Fiesole and workshop,

c.1455-1460, marble with traces of bole (red clay) and limestone with traces of paint, 83 x 84 x 25 cm.

‘Mino probably used ancient coins from the collection of the Medici,
Florence’s ruling family, as his starting point for this sculpture.
However, the complex carving, the clinging drapery, and the
psychological intensity all characterize the inventiveness Renaissance
artists brought to classical subject matter. In this case, Caesar
offered an important model for leadership, masculinity, and composure.
The garland is clearly by a different hand, but passages, such as the
ribbons and flowers in low relief, correspond to details found in other
decorative carvings from Mino’s workshop. Initially, the limestone
setting was probably put into a wall, perhaps in a lunette over the
door, from which it was later removed. However, the relationship between
the garland and the relief has not yet been clarified and is the
subject of ongoing research.’

The Cleveland Museum of Art

 Photography by Sailko for Wikimedia Commons

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maryboleyn:

Cleopatra is the only one you love… ( Leonor Varela as Cleopatra VII and Timony Dalton as Julius Caesar in “Cleopatra 1999″)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY @tiny-librarian