Head of a man 

Head of a man 

Campania, 3rd century BC. 

The head of a young man with wavy hair falling over the middle of the forehead. The physiognomic features correspond to one of the types of iconography of Alexander, a much earlier and better known example which is the bone portrait of the king found in the tomb of Philip II at Vergina (Archaeological Museum, Vergina). 

The same image appears in a mosaic in the House of the Faun at Pompeii, depicting the battle of Alexander and Darius, assumed to be a reproduction of a painted original. That would have been the magnificent work mentioned by Pliny, painted by Philoxenes from Eretria for Cassander´s palace in Pella in the last years of Alexander´s life or shortly after his death. At the same time, the treatment of the terracotta to make it look like a work in bronze, such as the use of the chisel to mark pupils and irises, the small lines at the corners of the lips and the manner of portraying locks of hair, are characteristic of Italian work. 

Source: The Immortal Alexander the Great, Hermitage Amsterdam 2010.

Beautiful drawing of Alexander the Great by Vi…

Beautiful drawing of Alexander the Great by Vincenzo Gemito.

Acropolis of Athens, Greece, 1961. 

Acropolis of Athens, Greece, 1961. 

Gold armband with Herakles knot. Hellenisti…

Gold armband with Herakles knot. Hellenistic, 3rd-2nd century BC, Greek, gold inlaid with garnets, emeralds and enamel. According to the Roman writer Pliny, the decorative device of the Herakles knot could cure wounds and its popularity in Hellenistic jewelry suggests that it was thought to have the power to avert evil. Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Bronze helmet, late 7th century BC, Greek, C…

Bronze helmet, late 7th century BC, Greek, Cretan. The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, New York. 

Marble head of Demosthenes, 2nd century A.D….

Marble head of Demosthenes, 2nd century A.D., Roman, Stone sculpture. Copy of a Greek bronze statue by Polyeuktos of ca. 280 B.C.

Demosthenes (ca. 384–322 b.c.) of Athens is widely considered to be the greatest orator of ancient Greece. Early on in his career, he recognized that the rise in power of Philip II of Macedonia was a danger to the independence of Greece and initiated a lifelong aggressive anti-Macedonian policy, which he pleaded publicly to the Athenians and the citizens of other Greek city-states. More than fifty Roman portraits of Demosthenes are known, an eloquent testimony to his continued popularity in Roman times. All the existing portraits appear to reflect a single Greek original, most likely the posthumous portrait statue by the sculptor Polyeuktos erected in the Agora (marketplace) of Athens in 280 B.C. The fine head captures the orator in a characteristically harsh, unhappy yet determined expression, the countenance of a noble fanatic, great mind, and passionate patriot.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum Of Art.

Limestone funerary relief, Hellenistic, ca. …

Limestone funerary relief, Hellenistic, ca. 325–300 B.C.

Tarentum (modern Taranto) was a wealthy Greek colony on the southeast coast of Italy, a pivotal location along the trade routes between Greece and Italy. During the fourth century B.C., ostentatious grave monuments in the form of small temple-like buildings decorated with painted sculpture filled the city cemetery. This relief must come from such a building. It represents a young warrior and a woman standing by an altar. Between them is a vase for pouring a libation on the altar. On the wall behind them hang a cuirass, a helmet, and a sword, presumably the arms of the dead warrior for whom they mourn. It has been suggested that the relief illustrates a scene from Greek tragedy.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum Of Art.

Marble portrait of the Empress Faustina the …

Marble portrait of the Empress Faustina the Younger, wife of the emperor Marcus Aurelius. Antonine, ca. 161-180 AD. Roman, Marble.

The well-formed but rather puffy features, the prominent eyes, and the deeply waved hair exemplify mid-Antonine standards of beauty and are identifying traits of this empress.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum Of Art.

The statue of Patroclus at the Temple of Hep…

The statue of Patroclus at the Temple of Hephaestus…his death would anger the ancient Greek hero, Achilles who would return to the battlefield for revenge….the momentum had changed in the Trojan War. (Photo: ca.1870 Getty Museum). Photo/text source John Trikeriotis. 

Gladiator helmet, 1 st century AD. found in …

Gladiator helmet, 1 st century AD. found in Pompeii. Naples National Archaeological Museum. Photo by my friend.